Watch Preview: The Story Behind 'The Draft' In The 1960s & '70s

Race, class, culture—the draft in the 1960s and ’70s was a lightning rod that lit up every schism in American society. But ending the draft has produced unintended consequences, creating a citizenry disconnected from that of the soldiers who experience the burden of endless wars. Featuring interviews with the people who fought the draft, supported it and lived its realities. Premieres Monday, April 27 at 9 pm HD The Draft
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How Humans Have Shaped the SW Florida Landscape

The Tamiami Trail refers to the southernmost 264 mile portion of U.S. Highway 41 stretching from Tampa to Miami. Construction of the east-west portion of the road through the Everglades was considered a monumental feat of engineering. On Saturday, April 25 the Museum of the Everglades recognizes the 87th anniversary of the opening of the Tamiami Trail with a series of events including a lecture by Melissa Timo with the Florida Public Archeology Network titled, “The Tamiami Trail and Other Projects of Profound and Unintended Consequence: The Archaeology of How Humans Have Shaped the Southwest Florida Landscape.”
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Find Great Ways To Explore SWFL At WGCU's 'Curious Kids' Website

Looking for fun, educational ways to explore SWFL with your kids? Start with the WGCU Curious Kids website to get excited about some great adventures that await all over our region. WGCU has produced 13 Curious Kids programs featuring more than 130 segments highlighting My Self… healthy eating, exercise and self-esteem; My Backyard.. the world of Southwest Florida from and environmental and historical perspective; and My World… exploring the people, places and ecology of Southwest Florida and discovering characteristics shared with countries across the world. Under the direction of international children’s educator /singer/songwriter, Rosie Emery, dozens of kids from Southwest Florida have starred in this award-winning program.
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Weather

On April 27, 1865, the steamboat Sultana exploded and sank while traveling up the Mississippi River, killing an estimated 1,800 people.

The event remains the worst maritime disaster in U.S. history (the Titanic killed 1,512 people). Yet few know the story of the Sultana's demise, or the ensuing rescue effort that included Confederate soldiers saving Union soldiers they might have shot just weeks earlier.

More than 1,000 days after James Holmes opened fire on an audience at a midnight movie in Aurora, Colo., his trial will begin in earnest Monday. His defense team admits Homes killed 12 people and injured 70 more; the trial is expected to turn on questions about Holmes' sanity – and whether he should be executed.

Nepal's devastating earthquake that hit Saturday is now blamed for at least 3,700 deaths. Reconstruction is estimated to cost billions. International aid efforts are underway, but aftershocks are rattling survivors' nerves and making the recovery even more challenging.

Rescue crews and aid groups are working to reach survivors — but their efforts are being hampered by the stricken areas' remote locations. Roads that are drivable are clogged with traffic.

We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people who've already experienced such an event, or who are at extremely high risk.

People have been lining up outside the U.S. Supreme Court for days hoping that they will be among the lucky ones to get a seat for Tuesday's historic arguments on gay marriage.

As of now, gay marriage is legal in 36 states. By the end of this Supreme Court term, same-sex couples with either be able to wed in all 50 states, or gay marriage bans may be reinstituted in many of the states where they've previously been struck down.

Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, is in the U.S. this week for a tightly packed visit that will focus largely on the strong ties between the U.S. and its closest Asian ally.

There was a time not so long ago that the prime minister's office in Tokyo appeared to have a revolving door. Japan went through four prime ministers during President Obama's first three years in office.

The U.S. Supreme Court directly confronts the question of gay marriage this week with a whopping two and a half hours of oral argument, accompanied by plenty of prognostication afterwards about the expected results. It won't be until June that we learn how the issue is settled nationally. In the meantime, though, we do know a good deal about the views of the justices already.

To say that there's been a revolution in the law when it comes to gay rights is an understatement.

A healthy diet is good for everyone. But as people get older, cooking nutritious food can become difficult and sometimes physically impossible. A pot of soup can be too heavy to lift. And there's all that time standing on your feet. It's one of the reasons that people move into assisted living facilities.

But a company called Chefs for Seniors has an alternative: They send professional cooks into seniors' homes. In a couple of hours they can whip up meals for the week.

As long as there have been schools and classes, there have have been students who don't show up. And educators scratching their heads over what to do about it.

In most states, missing a lot of school means a trip to the principal's office. In Texas, parents and students are more likely to end up in front of a judge.

It's been nearly three years since 12 people were killed in Aurora, Colo., at a midnight premier of the Batman movie, The Dark Knight Rises.

James Holmes' legal team admits he was behind the massacre, but there are two key questions: Was he insane and should he be put to death?

When the gunman stormed the theater and began firing into the crowd, Tom Teves says his son Alex made a split-second decision to shield his girlfriend.

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