Can't Wait? Watch A Preview What's Next On 'Wolf Hall'

With the cardinal dead, it falls to Cromwell to orchestrate a marriage between the king and Anne Boleyn. The king rewards Cromwell for his loyalty, but he is being closely watched by his enemies. Sunday, April 19 at 10 pm HD Masterpiece Classic
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FPL Promises Better Storm Service This Hurricane Season

We’re only a couple of months away from the beginning of hurricane season, and attention is on preventing power outages.Hurricane Wilma in 2005 knocked out service for more than 3 million customers.Since then, newer Florida Power and Light workers have yet to experience the effects of an actual hurricane. What they do have experience in isFPL’s recent high-tech approaches.“The younger people are really really adept to technology which is really where we’ve pushed our company and they’re just,...
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You’re Never Too Young: Stories of Skin Cancer

Skin. It’s the largest organ of the body. So, it’s not surprising that skin cancer, specifically melanoma, is in the top five of the most common cancers in the United States. The American Melanoma Foundation says one American dies of melanoma almost every hour. In the Sunshine State, melanoma is responsible for about 75 percent of all skin cancer deaths.
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This story is excerpted from an investigation by the Center for Public Integrity, a nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organization.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed a law today allowing nitrogen to be used in executions in the state in case lethal injection is ruled unconstitutional or the drugs are not available.

Hillary Clinton made a surprising move this week. It wasn't running for president — she'd already set the stage for that — but embracing the idea of a constitutional amendment to restrict or eliminate big money in politics.

The notion of amending the Constitution this way has been discussed, literally for decades. But Clinton is joining a new, if small, chorus of prominent politicians who are talking it up.

The first president of National Public Radio has died. Don Quayle was 84 years old. He had a long career in public broadcasting — both television and radio. NPR's Susan Stamberg reflects on his impact.

Don Quayle gave me my first radio job. It was the early '60s and he was head of the Educational Radio Network — the precursor of NPR — a skinny little network of 12 East Coast stations that developed a daily drive-time news show. He hired me to help produce it. When this national network arose, he was an obvious choice to run it.

Last Sunday, runner Kendall Schler was the first to cross the finish line at the GO! St. Louis Marathon. She received a $1,500 check and a photograph with Jackie Joyner-Kersee at the finish line. Trouble is Schler of Columbia, Mo., had not run the entire 26.2-mile course.

That's not all. Schler, race organizers say, also faked her third-place finish at last year's race – with a time that allowed her to qualify for the prestigious Boston Marathon this year.

West Africa is about to receive a hefty infusion of cash. This Friday the World Bank unveiled a major aid package for the three West African countries at the center of this past year's Ebola epidemic.

Note: Audio to come.  

April is Fair Housing Month. It marks the enactment of the Fair Housing Act of 1968. The act protects against housing discrimination based on things like a person’s race or gender.  Local representatives are taking the opportunity to host the Southwest Florida Fair Housing Summit on Tuesday.

Elite runners know the drill. When you run a marathon, you've got to consume extra amounts of carbohydrate — either from food or energy gels or energy drinks — in order to go the distance.

And if you don't fuel up enough? You may hit the wall during the big event, which, believe me, is pretty miserable.

The wall comes on abruptly. Suddenly your legs feel like lead. And then you're woozy.

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: the now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

Principal Nicholas Dean looks at his scarred, broken office door with resignation.

"Time to get a new lock," he says.

Over the weekend, a person or persons smashed into his office, found the keys to the school van and drove off in it.

It's another day at Crescent Leadership Academy, one of New Orleans' three second-chance schools for students who have not been successful elsewhere.

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