Watch Preview: The Story Behind 'The Draft' In The 1960s & '70s

Race, class, culture—the draft in the 1960s and ’70s was a lightning rod that lit up every schism in American society. But ending the draft has produced unintended consequences, creating a citizenry disconnected from that of the soldiers who experience the burden of endless wars. Featuring interviews with the people who fought the draft, supported it and lived its realities. Premieres Monday, April 27 at 9 pm HD The Draft
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How Humans Have Shaped the SW Florida Landscape

The Tamiami Trail refers to the southernmost 264 mile portion of U.S. Highway 41 stretching from Tampa to Miami. Construction of the east-west portion of the road through the Everglades was considered a monumental feat of engineering. On Saturday, April 25 the Museum of the Everglades recognizes the 87th anniversary of the opening of the Tamiami Trail with a series of events including a lecture by Melissa Timo with the Florida Public Archeology Network titled, “The Tamiami Trail and Other Projects of Profound and Unintended Consequence: The Archaeology of How Humans Have Shaped the Southwest Florida Landscape.”
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Find Great Ways To Explore SWFL At WGCU's 'Curious Kids' Website

Looking for fun, educational ways to explore SWFL with your kids? Start with the WGCU Curious Kids website to get excited about some great adventures that await all over our region. WGCU has produced 13 Curious Kids programs featuring more than 130 segments highlighting My Self… healthy eating, exercise and self-esteem; My Backyard.. the world of Southwest Florida from and environmental and historical perspective; and My World… exploring the people, places and ecology of Southwest Florida and discovering characteristics shared with countries across the world. Under the direction of international children’s educator /singer/songwriter, Rosie Emery, dozens of kids from Southwest Florida have starred in this award-winning program.
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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

One day soon, you may be waiting in line for a coffee, eyeing a pastry, when your smart watch buzzes with a warning.

Flashing on the tiny screen of your Apple Watch is a message from an app called Lark, suggesting that you lay off the carbs for today. Speak into the Apple Watch's built-in mic about your food, sleep and exercise, and the app will send helpful tips back to you.

It has been five years since the so-called flash crash on Wall Street raised big questions about computerized trading. What caused the flash crash has been a topic of debate ever since. U.S. officials revived the debate this week by arresting a little-known trader in London.

May 6, 2010, started out as an ordinary trading day on Wall Street. Then, at around 2:45 in the afternoon, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged nearly 600 points within the space of a few minutes, before correcting itself.

Updated at 11:10 a.m. ET

A powerful magnitude 7.8 earthquake has struck Nepal near the capital Kathmandu today, killing at least 876 people there as well as dozens in three neighboring countries as it leveled houses and temples and triggered avalanches on Mount Everest at the peak of the climbing season there.

Rap City: Sweat, Hope & Hip-Hop In Dakar

3 hours ago

An orange streetlight glows over the sandy street corner. The surrounding alleys and cement buildings disappear into darkness at the edge of the light. It is 11 p.m. on this July night,, temperatures are still in the high 80s and a cool breeze is nowhere to be found.

Young men hustle to arrange hulking, rusted speakers on either side of a small wooden platform. Others hover by the streetlight. They wear crisp T-shirts with bold lettering and splashes of color.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pepe Guerrero is a doorman at a high-rise building in Malaga, on Spain's Mediterranean coast. From his post he looks out at the turquoise blue waters — where hundreds of Arab and African migrants have drowned in recent weeks.

"They're people — human beings like us," he says. "Searching for a better life."

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