WGCU Honors Greatest Generation With 'WWII VETS: Stories of Service'

WATCH and LISTEN online. WGCU Public Media is honoring the “greatest generation” through WWII VETS: Stories of Service. WGCU-FM is airing audio portraits Thursdays in May – at 8:45am during Morning Edition and 5:45pm during All Things Considered.
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Bandwidth And Bikinis: Cuban Entrepreneurs Make Web Pilgrimages To Miami

Press Listen to hear the radio version of this reportWhen Cuban bikini maker Victor Rodríguez visited Miami this month, he was on a pilgrimage – not just for bathing suits but for bandwidth.The most important stop on Rodríguez’s schedule was lunch in Wynwood, Miami’s high-tech district, with Mel Valenzuela, who owns the online swimwear store Pretty Beachy.As Valenzuela showed Rodríguez how to do business online, his awestruck expression seemed to evokeJosé Arcadio Buendía in “One Hundred...
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Weather

More than 750 people are dead in India in a heat wave that has seen temperatures in some parts of the country touching 118 degrees.

Most of the deaths have occurred in southern Andhra Pradesh and Telangana states. The Associated Press reports that more than 550 people have died in Andhra Pradesh since May 13; the number is 215 in Telangana since April 15. Indian news sites say the toll has exceeded 1,000.

When the Supreme Court returns for its next term in October, among the cases it has agreed to hear is a challenge to a fundamental practice that has governed American elections for generations.

When public-policy makers talk about a state's population, they generally mean the number of human beings living in that state — as counted or estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau.

That applies to a host of political actions, including the apportionment of seats in Congress and the Electoral College votes that choose the president.

Out Of The Classroom And Into The Woods

7 hours ago

Kids in the U.S. are spending less time outside. Even in kindergarten, recess is being cut back. But in the small town of Quechee, Vt., a teacher is bucking that trend: One day a week, she takes her students outside — for the entire school day.

It's called Forest Monday.

Eliza Minnucci got the idea after watching a documentary about a forest school in Switzerland where kids spend all day, every day, out in the woods.

The IRS says criminals gained access to the accounts of more than 100,000 taxpayers through its online service Get Transcript. The data stolen included taxpayers' Social Security information, when they were born and their street addresses.

At a news conference, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said criminals made about 200,000 attempts to access tax information; 100,000 of those attempts, made from February to mid-May, were successful.

820 Floridians could die from melanoma this year. It’s the most lethal form of skin cancer. A recent study cited by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 6000 cases of melanoma are estimated to be related to indoor tanning in the U.S. each year. May is melanoma month. This story looks at one group of people who is seeing a dramatic rise in the number of these cases. They’re young women and teens. And they’re the same group also going to tanning salons more often.

The governor’s commission looking at health care funding discussed performance funding for hospitals. The commission is tasked with looking at how taxpayer dollars are used to support health care for the poor. 
 
The commission met today in Orlando. The nine-member group delved through detailed hospital statistics, and started brainstorming ideas for how to reform hospital payments. 

Documentary photographer Dorothea Lange had a favorite saying: "A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera."

And perhaps no one did more to reveal the human toll of the Great Depression than Lange, who was born on this day in 1895. Her photographs gave us an unflinching — but also deeply humanizing — look at the struggles of displaced farmers, migrant laborers, sharecroppers and others at the bottom of the American farm economy as it reeled through the 1930s.

At least 2,500 years ago, tea, as we know it, was born.

Back then, it was a medicinal concoction blended with herbs, seeds and forest leaves in the mountains of southwest China. Gradually, as manners of processing and drinking tea were refined, it became imbued with artistic, religious, and cultural notes. Under the Tang Dynasty (AD 618–907), the apogee of ancient Chinese prosperity, the drink involved ritual, etiquette and specific utensils. During this period of splendor, the first book dedicated solely to tea was written by Lu Yü.

An unidentified New Jersey man died after returning home from West Africa, where he had contracted Lassa fever, a virus that has symptoms similar to those of Ebola. Federal health officials are treating the case with caution because the virus, which commonly is spread by rodents, can occasionally spread from person to person.

Ignatius Agon practices his greeting: "OK, good evening ladies and gentlemen. My name is Ignatius and I am going to guide you into the dark."

It's Monday, and the first day of training for a new restaurant opening this month in Kenya. Diners will be served in the dark. They'll have to find their food with their forks and eat it in a pitch black room.

And the waiters are blind.

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