Watch Preview: The Story Behind 'The Draft' In The 1960s & '70s

Race, class, culture—the draft in the 1960s and ’70s was a lightning rod that lit up every schism in American society. But ending the draft has produced unintended consequences, creating a citizenry disconnected from that of the soldiers who experience the burden of endless wars. Featuring interviews with the people who fought the draft, supported it and lived its realities. Premieres Monday, April 27 at 9 pm HD The Draft
Read More

How Humans Have Shaped the SW Florida Landscape

The Tamiami Trail refers to the southernmost 264 mile portion of U.S. Highway 41 stretching from Tampa to Miami. Construction of the east-west portion of the road through the Everglades was considered a monumental feat of engineering. On Saturday, April 25 the Museum of the Everglades recognizes the 87th anniversary of the opening of the Tamiami Trail with a series of events including a lecture by Melissa Timo with the Florida Public Archeology Network titled, “The Tamiami Trail and Other Projects of Profound and Unintended Consequence: The Archaeology of How Humans Have Shaped the Southwest Florida Landscape.”
Read More

Find Great Ways To Explore SWFL At WGCU's 'Curious Kids' Website

Looking for fun, educational ways to explore SWFL with your kids? Start with the WGCU Curious Kids website to get excited about some great adventures that await all over our region. WGCU has produced 13 Curious Kids programs featuring more than 130 segments highlighting My Self… healthy eating, exercise and self-esteem; My Backyard.. the world of Southwest Florida from and environmental and historical perspective; and My World… exploring the people, places and ecology of Southwest Florida and discovering characteristics shared with countries across the world. Under the direction of international children’s educator /singer/songwriter, Rosie Emery, dozens of kids from Southwest Florida have starred in this award-winning program.
Read More

Weather

"Welcome to Iowa State University. May I take your paper, please?"

A bill circulating in the Iowa state Senate would rate professors' performance based on student evaluations. Just student evaluations.

Low-rated professors would be automatically fired — no tenure, no appeals.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Staten Island Candidates Avoid Talk Of Eric Garner Case

52 minutes ago
Copyright 2015 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wnyc.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Baltimore Protests Turn Violent

52 minutes ago
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Danny Kou, the executive chef at La Mar, an upscale Peruvian restaurant in San Francisco, says it's a good time to be him.

Kou moved from Lima to the United States when he was 21. It was 2001, and back then, Peruvian cuisine was still unfamiliar in North America.

Would Doctors Be Better If They Didn't Have To Memorize?

3 hours ago

Poor old Dr. Krebs. His painstaking Nobel-winning work on cellular metabolism, called the Krebs cycle, has made him the symbol for what's ailing medical education.

"Why do I need to know this stuff?" medical students ask me.

"How many times have you used the Krebs Cycle lately?" senior doctors jokingly reminisce.

A magnitude-6.7 aftershock rumbled Katmandu and sent people running for open ground Sunday morning, a day after a massive 7.8-magnitude earthquake ravaged Nepal and the region and killed more than 2,100 people.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the aftershock, the largest of numerous aftershocks rattling frightened residents, registered at a shallow depth of 6 miles.

It's a long-time ritual — American presidents going before the Washington journalists who cover them to recognize some of the best work of the prior year from the assembled crowd.

Of course, there are also jokes. Here are eight Obama jokes that stood out from the 2015 White House Correspondents Dinner:

Pages