Watch 'Reading, Writing & Civil Rights' Online

The Lee County school district may have been one of the last to satisfy the courts, but schools in Punta Gorda and Sanibel Island were among the first in Florida to integrate their students. Some 50 years later, several Southwest Florida residents share their memories of being the first African Americans to brave one of the most dramatic social experiments of the 20th century. Mark your calendar for Mar. 11 at 1pm when a Gulf Coast LIVE radio segment will feature a panel discussion from the...
Read More

Why Music Therapists Want To Be Licensed in Florida

Music is often part of some of our biggest moments. From singing happy birthday to your favorite song that you always sing along to, music can help you connect and remember. Studies have shown that music can also become a form of therapy.Only seven states require a license for music therapists. Florida isn't one of them.But some music therapy professionals in the Sunshine State are trying to change that.
Read More

Weather

Massive avalanches in a valley not far from the Afghan capital have reportedly killed nearly 200 people, adding to a total of almost 250 deaths from the worst such snow slides in three decades in the country's mountainous northeast.

Rescue workers using bulldozers worked to clear roads to the Panjshir Valley area just northeast of Kabul — an area where villagers have been cut off for almost a week.

Nearly two-thirds of Millennials who identify as Republican support legalizing marijuana, while almost half of older GOP Gen-Xers do, according to a recently released Pew survey that could be an indicator of where the debate is heading.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has announced a reduction in U.S. diplomatic staff in the country and restrictions on travel by U.S. citizens there –- as he accused Washington of "gringo" meddling.

The BBC reports:

"The president said that the US government had 100 employees working in Venezuela whereas Venezuela had 17 based in the US.

Astronauts at the International Space Station have ventured outside to perform a challenging cable installation on their orbiting platform.

Spacewalkers Terry Virts and Butch Wilmore have 400 feet of cable to install as well as two sets of antennas.

Tens of thousands of people are gathering in the Russian capital to mourn Boris Nemtsov, the former deputy prime minister turned harsh critic of President Vladimir Putin who was gunned down on a Moscow street last week.

The march, originally scheduled to oppose Russian involvement in Ukraine, was to have been led by Nemtsov himself. Following his murder, however, the gathering has turned into a wake for the fallen opposition leader.

NPR's Corey Flintoff, reporting from the rally in Moscow, says the demonstration is peaceful.

Wendy Lee, an anti-fracking activist and philosophy professor at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, has always protested peacefully. So she was stunned last winter when a state trooper came to her home to ask her about eco-terrorism and pipe bombs.

The trooper was investigating an alleged trespassing incident that involved Lee and two other activists visiting a gas compressor in Pennsylvania's Lycoming County in June 2013. Lee says they stayed on a public road and left when security guards told them to go away.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In Israel, religious law governs family matters.

For a Jewish divorce, an Orthodox rabbi oversees a ritual that begins with the husband placing a folded decree into the wife's cupped hands. But that paper can be hard to get, because the husband can refuse to grant the divorce.

A new Israeli film playing in the U.S. shows how patriarchal Jewish divorce laws can trap even secular women for years.

The film is a drama called Gett: The trial of Viviane Ansalem. Viviane wants a divorce but needs her husband's permission.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages