Familiar Faces and New Trouble in Part 3 of 'Indian Summers'

Sooni gets into trouble, witness-tampering runs riot, Ramu confronts Armitage and Dougie confesses to Sarah. Premieres Sunday, October 11 at 9:00 pm Masterpiece Indian Summers, Part 3
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Mike Donlan

WGCU Honors SWFL American Graduate Champions

American Graduate Champions are individuals who dedicate their time, talent, and resources to prepare students of all ages for success. The Champions are role models whose stories inspire others to take action.
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After a few days of dry conditions, rain is once again in the forecast for South Carolina.

Torrential rains — in some parts, 20 inches in two days — have caused historic flooding in the state, which is still recovering. Parts of I-95, for example, are still closed.

Weather.com reports that the good news is that the new storms aren't forecast to drop torrential rains:

At least 30 people have been killed and 125 injured in two bomb explosions, reportedly targeting a peace rally in central Ankara, Turkey. The explosions occurred near the capital's train station early Saturday morning.

The BBC's Mark Lowen tells our Newscast unit:

How They Spent Their Global Summer Vacation

1 hour ago

How did you spend your summer vacation?

If you're studying global affairs, international policy, intercultural studies or public health in the developing world, summer vacation often means fieldwork far from campus dorms (and familiar comforts).

We asked three graduate students in international studies programs to tell us how they spent their global summer vacations.

Who: Tatenda Yemeke, a native of Zimbabwe, working toward a master's degree in the Duke University Global Health program

If you've never tasted a pawpaw, now is the moment.

For just a few weeks every year in September and October, this native, mango-like fruit falls from trees, everywhere from Virginia to Kansas and many points westward. (We discovered them several years back along the banks of the Potomac River when we ran into some kayakers who were snacking on them.)

Since the diplomatic thaw with Cuba was first announced last December, the Obama administration has moved aggressively to ease restrictions on travel and trade. Looser rules were announced in January, and restrictions were eased further in September. But the Commerce and Treasury Departments can only go so far, unless Congress votes to lift the legal embargo.

Here we go: some international soccer news that doesn't involve FIFA President Sepp Blatter.

A Scottish nurse who recovered from Ebola in January has been medevaced from Glasgow to London in a Royal Air Force C-130 Hercules transport plane specially equipped for infection control.

Doctors say Pauline Cafferkey is suffering "an unusual late complication" from her previous Ebola infection. They note that "Pauline previously had the Ebola virus and this is therefore not a new infection."

Over the summer, the Texas Forensic Science Commission, which sets standards for physical evidence in state courts, came to an unsettling conclusion: There was something wrong with how state labs were analyzing DNA evidence.

It seemed the labs were using an outdated protocol for calculating the probability of DNA matches in "mixtures"; that is, crime scene samples that contain genetic material from several people. It may have affected thousands of cases going back to 1999.

Chaos ensued in the halls of Congress Thursday when Rep. Kevin McCarthy unexpectedly took himself out of the running to replace John Boehner as speaker of the House.

The reason for the pandemonium and, yes, even tears: No one knows where this goes from here.

Here are the four likely ways it gets resolved:

The Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office announced Friday it will equip its deputies with a drug called naloxone. It stops people from overdosing on opioids like heroin.

It’s a first for Florida law enforcement agencies.


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