Nature’s Guide to Animal Homes Explores 'Animal Cities'

For some animals, living in the midst of huge colonies is the most secure and rewarding housing arrangement. Icelandic puffins form colonies of more than a million, providing shared information about food sources and reducing the odds of attacks. Social spiders in Ecuador work together to capture prey 20 times the size an individual might subdue. Premieres Wednesday, April 22 at 8 pm HD Nature
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Senate Committee Takes Up Adoption Discrimination Bill

A Florida Senate Committee is set to take up a bill today that would permit adoption agencies to turn away gay individuals or same-sex couples on the basis of a moral or religious belief.
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Find Great Ways To Explore SWFL At WGCU's 'Curious Kids' Website

Looking for fun, educational ways to explore SWFL with your kids? Start with the WGCU Curious Kids website to get excited about some great adventures that await all over our region. WGCU has produced 13 Curious Kids programs featuring more than 130 segments highlighting My Self… healthy eating, exercise and self-esteem; My Backyard.. the world of Southwest Florida from and environmental and historical perspective; and My World… exploring the people, places and ecology of Southwest Florida and discovering characteristics shared with countries across the world. Under the direction of international children’s educator /singer/songwriter, Rosie Emery, dozens of kids from Southwest Florida have starred in this award-winning program.
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Weather

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Palm oil is in everything, from pizza dough and chocolate to laundry detergent and lipstick. Non-governmental organizations blame it for contributing to assorted evils, from global warming to human rights abuses.

But in the past year, this complex global industry has changed, as consumers put pressure on producers to show that they're not destroying forests, killing rare animals, grabbing land or exploiting workers.

In Hawaii, a battle is going on over the future of a mountaintop. Native Hawaiians say it's sacred ground, while astronomers say it's the best place in the world to build a massive, 18-story telescope.

This is not simply a story of religion versus science. Activists consider the construction of a giant telescope on the island of Hawaii to be a desecration of their sacred land.

Most people can't imagine living without smartphones or the Internet, let alone without electricity. But even today — even in the United States — there are still people who live without lights and refrigeration. Many are Native Americans living on tribal reservations.

For many, electricity is a luxury; it can even be magical. Derrick Terry remembers the first winter when there were lights on at his grandmother's house.

The Affordable Care Act requires all Americans to get health insurance or pay a penalty. To help coax people to buy a health plan, the federal government now subsidizes premiums for millions of Americans.

National Guard Seeks New Mission After War

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NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the first of four reports this week about the National Guard.

The Army spent billions of dollars getting the National Guard ready for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But now that the money has been spent and troops are coming home, there are questions about the Guard's mission.

The U.S. Navy has dispatched an aircraft carrier to waters off the coast of Yemen.

As NPR's Jackie Northam reports, the vessels are joining others in the region in an increasing show of force. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The U.S. Navy says it's deploying the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the guided-missile cruiser Normandy to the Gulf of Aden to ensure the vital shipping lanes in the volatile region remain open and safe.

Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution.

You may never have heard of Moore's law, but it has a lot do with why you will pay about the same price for your next computer, smartphone or tablet, even though it will be faster and have better screen resolution than the last one.

An Argentine prosecutor moved on Monday to dismiss accusations leveled against President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner by the late prosecutor Alberto Nisman.

If you remember, right before he was found dead in his home, Nisman was about to tell lawmakers that he wanted to charge Kirchner for allegedly thwarting an investigation into the deadly 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires.

"They're running a little late," chides an elderly gentleman, tapping his watch at 12:02 p.m. He's come to this farm near the Danish city of Ikast, along with about 1,500 others, to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday in Denmark. It's the Sunday in mid-April when thousands of organic dairy cows at 75 farms across the country are released into the green fields of spring. At exactly 12 noon. Eh hem.

Ah, but here they come!

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