Rediscover Your Favorite 'Downton Abbey' Moments Before the Final Season

Relive treasured moments from the five seasons of Downton Abbey and sample the next and final season. Savor clips, behind-the-scenes footage and interviews with Julian Fellowes, Gareth Neame and the series’ cast. Paula Kerger, PBS president, hosts. Premieres Sunday, August 9 at 8:00 pm
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Get Ready To Nominate A 2016 MAKER

Nominations for 2016 MAKERS will be open from August 15, 2015 to October 15, 2015 at WGCU’s MAKERS: Women Who Make Southwest Florida website, a digital platform that honors 40 women whose stories are preserved for generations to come. You can visit the site at www.wgcumakers.org. MAKERS: Women Who Make Southwest Florida was inspired in 2012 by the launch of PBS www.makers.com, which seeks to be the largest video collection of women’s stories ever assembled. If you have a woman in mind who is...
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He was probably about 40 years old, 155 pounds, white, and wearing a suit. And he's the reason why women are shivering at their desks in air-conditioned buildings.

At some point in the 1930s, someone defined "metabolic equivalents" – how much energy a body requires while sitting, walking and running. Almost a century later, the back-of-the-envelope calculations are considered a standard for many things, including air conditioning.

The relatives of 16 victims of the 2012 elementary school massacre in Newtown, Conn., reached a proposed $1.5 million settlement Monday against the estate of the shooter's mother.

According to the Hartford Courant, each family will receive $93,750 apiece from a homeowner insurance policy that Nancy Lanza had on a Newtown home she shared with her son Adam.

The lawsuits were filed by the families of 14 victims who died in the school shooting and two who survived.

In a first, the Food and Drug Administration has given approval to a drug that is produced on a 3-D printer. The pill, produced by Aprecia Pharmaceuticals, treats seizures. It's expected to hit the market in the first quarter of 2016.

NPR's Rob Stein reports for our Newscast unit:

"The drug is called Spritam and is designed to treat seizures in people suffering from epilepsy. It's a new version of a seizure medication that's been on the market for years.

Walk along one of the many streams and rivers in the West Nile region of Uganda, and you'll notice something funny. All along the riverbanks, you'll see small pieces of blue cloth, attached to wooden stakes in the ground. There's one every 50 yards or so.

No, this isn't some half-baked public art project. These dinky contraptions are actually flytraps, designed to lure and kill tsetse flies, whose bites transmit a parasitic disease called sleeping sickness, which, like rabies, drives victims mad before it kills them.

Florida wildlife officials are confident the state’s first bear hunt in two decades will move forward despite a lawsuit aimed to stop it. Members of the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission approved a hunt they say is backed by numbers.

In October, hunters will be allowed to kill 320 of the state’s estimated 3,000 bears. Spokeswoman Diane Eggeman says those figures were approved based on the most recent data from scientists.

Hunters will have access to bears in four areas where the bear population has recovered.

A man and a girl were killed while watching a traveling circus show Monday evening, after a strong storm dislodged the circus tent's poles and caused a collapse. Officials are now working to find out more about what went wrong at the fairgrounds in Lancaster, N.H.

"We lost two lives — a father and a daughter — at an event that was supposed to be fun," Gov. Maggie Hassan told local TV station WMUR.

Braden Swenson wanders into a semi-rickety wooden shed on his search for gold, treasure and riches.

"Is there any treasure in here?" he asks in the endearing dialect of a 4-year-old. "I've been looking everywhere for them. I can't find any." The proto-pirate toddler conducts a quick search, then wanders away to continue his quest elsewhere.

Not far away, Ethan Lipsie, age 9, clutches a framing hammer and a nine-penny nail. He's ready to hang his freshly painted sign on a wooden "fort" he's been hammering away on. It says, "Ethan, Hudson and William were here."

You're probably at least a little bit racist and sexist and homophobic. Most of us are.

Before you get all indignant, try taking one of the popular implicit-association tests. Created by sociologists at Harvard, the University of Washington, and the University of Virginia, they measure people's unconscious prejudice by testing how easy — or difficult — it is for the test-takers to associate words like "good" and "bad" with images of black people versus white people, or "scientist" and "lab" with men versus women.

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