Satisfy Your Family's Urge To Explore With Curious Kids TV Show; Website & More

The Curious Kids cast and crew have been out and about in beautiful Southwest Florida equipped with lots of questions. A trip to Rookery Bay, had them asking, “What came first, a scorpion or a scorpion fish?” In trying to understand how the watershed works in Southwest Florida, they wondered “How does water travel from Lake Okeechobee to the Charlotte Harbor Estuary?” When they got tired and hungry, they asked Miss Betsy, “Do some foods give you more energy than others?” And, on a visit to...
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Bill Aims to End Gay Conversion Therapy for Minors

A Florida lawmaker is pushing legislation that would prohibit a controversial kind of therapy aimed at LGBT youths. The bill could stop the use of so-called “gay conversion therapy” in the state.
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The Dunk City Effect

Sunday, Dec. 21 @ 11:30am WGCU-TV 3/440

What's On Now

Soccer's governing body is sticking to its guns.

FIFA has voted not to revisit the bidding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups. It also decided to release, at some later date, at least part of a 430-page confidential report produced by American lawyer Michael Garcia.

Thailand's prime minister says his government had no knowledge of a secret location inside the country where the CIA is said to have waterboarded top al-Qaida operatives in 2002.

Sabal Palm

1 hour ago

This week, News-Press storyteller Amy Bennett Williams pays homage to Florida’s state tree: the sabal Palm. Sabal palms can be found all over her rural Alva homestead and can grow in just about any soil making it the most widely distributed palm tree in the state. In addition to its aesthetic beauty, the sabal palm is also useful for food and medicine. And for Florida’s wild creatures it can be both a harbinger of life...and death.

Medicare has begun punishing 721 hospitals with high rates of infections and other medical errors, cutting payments to half the nation's major teaching hospitals and many institutions that are marquee names.

President Obama will close out 2014 with his traditional end-of-year press conference.

The press conference is scheduled to begin at 1:30 p.m. ET., and it's bound to be eventful because Obama has a lot to talk about.

Among the news events that will likely come up:

-- The normalization of diplomatic relations with Cuba.

Two days after the U.S. and Cuba decided to end a more than 50-year estrangement, the natural question is: What's next?

On Morning Edition, NPR's Michelle Kelemen reports that the process of normalizing diplomatic relations will be pretty straight forward and is likely to be done quickly.

"We can do that via an exchange of letter or notes. It doesn't require a formal sort of legal treaty or agreement," Roberta Jacobson, assistant secretary of state for the western hemisphere, said during a briefing on Thursday.

Today the Education Department released long-awaited details on a plan to hold colleges accountable for their performance on several key indicators, and officials said they'll be seeking public comment on the proposals through February.

"As a nation, we have to make college more accessible and affordable and ensure that all students graduate with a quality education of real value," Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a statement.

Best-selling business books typically tell you how to get rich — either by becoming a better worker or investor, or perhaps by learning the secrets of successful entrepreneurs.

And in 2014, readers could find plenty of books promoting pluck and hard work, such as MONEY Master the Game and The Innovators.

But three books broke the pattern, generating headlines and big sales by focusing on unfair aspects of wealth creation.

On the eastern edge of St. Joseph, Mo., lies the small city's only hospital, a landmark of modern brick and glass buildings. Everyone in town knows Heartland Regional Medical Center — many residents gave birth to their children here. Many rush here when they get hurt or sick.

This week's historic agreement between the U.S. and Cuba to reinstate diplomatic relations after decades of silence could launch a digital revolution in the island nation.

According to the White House, only 5 percent of Cubans have access to the open Internet, comparable to North Korea. As part of the deal, that could change overnight.

Status Check

Maribel Fonseca, a teacher in Miramar, Cuba, has never seen the Internet. A few of her more privileged students have been online.

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