Watch Preview: The Story Behind 'The Draft' In The 1960s & '70s

Race, class, culture—the draft in the 1960s and ’70s was a lightning rod that lit up every schism in American society. But ending the draft has produced unintended consequences, creating a citizenry disconnected from that of the soldiers who experience the burden of endless wars. Featuring interviews with the people who fought the draft, supported it and lived its realities. Premieres Monday, April 27 at 9 pm HD The Draft
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How Humans Have Shaped the SW Florida Landscape

The Tamiami Trail refers to the southernmost 264 mile portion of U.S. Highway 41 stretching from Tampa to Miami. Construction of the east-west portion of the road through the Everglades was considered a monumental feat of engineering. On Saturday, April 25 the Museum of the Everglades recognizes the 87th anniversary of the opening of the Tamiami Trail with a series of events including a lecture by Melissa Timo with the Florida Public Archeology Network titled, “The Tamiami Trail and Other Projects of Profound and Unintended Consequence: The Archaeology of How Humans Have Shaped the Southwest Florida Landscape.”
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Find Great Ways To Explore SWFL At WGCU's 'Curious Kids' Website

Looking for fun, educational ways to explore SWFL with your kids? Start with the WGCU Curious Kids website to get excited about some great adventures that await all over our region. WGCU has produced 13 Curious Kids programs featuring more than 130 segments highlighting My Self… healthy eating, exercise and self-esteem; My Backyard.. the world of Southwest Florida from and environmental and historical perspective; and My World… exploring the people, places and ecology of Southwest Florida and discovering characteristics shared with countries across the world. Under the direction of international children’s educator /singer/songwriter, Rosie Emery, dozens of kids from Southwest Florida have starred in this award-winning program.
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A Most Indelible Ink: A Magazine Printed Using Blood

2 hours ago

"Written in blood" is usually hyperbole. Not so in the case of the latest issue of a Lebanese music and culture magazine.

Audio Kultur used real blood to publish the magazine commemorating the 100th anniversary of the massacre of 1.5 million Armenians.

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we bring you four reads:

From Ina Jaffe, a correspondent on NPR's National Desk:

The Steller's sea cow, the passenger pigeon and the New Zealand moa all went extinct because people developed a taste for their meat.

High on a West Bank hilltop, the extended Dissi family gathered on a recent weekend for a day out in the Palestinian countryside.

Aunts, uncles and cousins came to see the half-built weekend home of Taysier Dissi, an electrician and father of three. The concrete-block shell, with windows set and stairs roughed in, is placed just right for the view.

This will be the family's getaway from their home in the cramped confines of Jerusalem's often tense Old City. Dissi paid about $30,000 for one-third of an acre here, bought from a Palestinian-Canadian company, UCI.

It's springtime in Pittsburgh, and throughout the city, Callery pear trees are sprouting beautiful, white blossoms.

But that's just the problem. Simply put, these trees stink.

"This whole place smells like dead fish," says Sheila Titus. "I mean everywhere. Everywhere you see one of these trees with the white on them."

Titus has lived in her home in the now hip neighborhood of Lawrenceville for 49 years. Two decades ago, her grandson and his 7th grade class planted a row of Callery pears across the street from her house.

Police officials in Baltimore admitted that their officers should have provided medical attention immediately following the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Instead, Deputy Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said during a press conference, police officers put handcuffed Gray and put him in the back of a police van without ever buckling him in.

The van went on to make three different stops across town. At the first, Gray was shackeled, but at no point said Commissioner Anthony Batts was Gray ever buckled into the van.

Same-sex marriage is legal in most states but so is discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodation.

Gay-rights activists say this creates a contradiction because in many states someone can legally marry a person of the same gender and then get fired for being gay. They are lobbying state legislatures to add LGBT people to anti-discrimination laws that already include things like race, age, religion and disability.

Usually police simulators are tucked away in training academies. But in a Charlotte, N.C., middle school gym, a crowd of 100 people watches Capt. Rob Dance as he leads a teenager through a simulated traffic stop that goes bad.

The simulator lets out several loud bangs. Dance notices the teen is nervous, his hands are shaking.

"You shot 24 times," he tells the student. "Did you realize that?"

When my mother passed away, I was by her side in a peaceful, sunny room at a hospice in South Florida. The sliding glass doors looked out to a flourishing garden filled with bougainvillea, rosebushes and carefully cultivated grasses. A block of sunlight, alive with swirling dust, hit the edge of my mother's bed where the tops of her small bony feet made a lump under the light cotton covers.

Hearing the words of a 24-year-old victim of human trafficking — and her struggle to wipe away her conviction on prostitution charges — inspired New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen.

That young victim, who was featured in an NPR story in February, endured years of rapes and brutal assaults by pimps who forced her into prostitution.

"I'm not ever going to forget what I've done or what I've gone through. But at the same time, I don't want it thrown in my face every time I'm trying to seek employment," she said. "I don't want to have to explain myself every time."

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