Joe Brunette/©2013 THIRTEEN Productions LLC

'Parrot Confidential' Explores Difficulties Of Raising Parrots

From the wilds of Costa Rica to the suburbs of our own country, Nature explores the difficulties of raising parrots, why some breeders and owners become rescuers, and conservation efforts in the wild when Parrot Confidential airs Wednesday at 8pm. Talk to enough owners of parrots about their experiences raising an African gray or yellow-naped Amazon and, while their stories may differ, there seems to be a consensus that not everyone is cut out for the task. Unlike dogs and cats, parrots have...
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Conservation Organization, Scientists File Suit Over Endangered Bird

Note: Audio to come.An environmental conservation organization and two scientists are suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other government bodies alleging the Corps’ water practices in the Everglades are threatening an endangered bird species.
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Weather

Just past 9 p.m. every night, six crew members from the Leros division of the Greek Coast Guard board a bright orange search-and-rescue vessel and depart from the tiny Aegean island of Leros.

They patrol until dawn, looking out for boats in distress, packed with migrants trying to reach Europe.

"We see people almost every day, at least 40 people at a time, just in our area," says Captain Leonidas Papadakis. "Most say they're from Syria. Others say Afghanistan, Iraq." There are also Ghanians, Ugandans, even the occasional Dominican.

As a U.S. territory with tropical weather and beautiful beaches, Puerto Rico has a lot going for it. But there are downsides to living on an island. A big one is the cost of energy.

All the electricity on the island is distributed by the government-owned Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, also known as PREPA. Power on the island costs more than in any U.S. state, except Hawaii.

And that's not the biggest problem.

Losing A Hospital In The Heart Of A Small City

28 minutes ago

In a leafy suburb of Cleveland, 108-year-old Lakewood Hospital is expected to close in the next two years, for economic reasons. Mike Summers points to the fourth floor windows on the far left side of the historic brick building. He recalls spending three weeks in one of those rooms. It was Christmas 1965 and Summers had a broken hip.

"I remember hearing Christmas bells from the church across the street," he says.

It was a plot to rival Foucault's Pendulum: Police in Los Angeles arrested three people in connection with operating a fictitious police department they said was 3,000 years old and had jurisdiction over 33 states and Mexico.

Jim Wright occupies a kind of shadow territory in Washington memory. He rose to be speaker of the House, arguably the second most powerful job in the country. For a season he challenged the authority of the president on foreign policy. A master of the internal politics and practices of the House, Wright once seemed likely to rule that world for as long as the Democrats held the majority — which he and they and most everyone else expected to last forever.

Oil prices hit a new high for the year Wednesday — closing at just under $61 a barrel. They've been rallying for a month, but nobody's predicting $4-per-gallon gasoline anytime soon. And some analysts say weak demand will send oil prices down again.

The recent rise follows an historic drop in prices, which were as low as about $45 a barrel less than two months ago.

So to understand what's going on now, let's look at what sent prices tumbling in the first place

Recovering from pneumonia is an unusual experience in the 10-bed intensive care unit at the Carolinas HealthCare System hospital in rural Lincolnton, N.C.

The small hospital has its regular staff, but Richard Gilbert, one of the ICU patients, has an extra nurse who is 45 miles away. That nurse, Cassie Gregor, sits in front of six computer screens in an office building. She wears a headset and comes into Gilbert's room via a computer screen.

Scientists have discovered a group of microbes at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean that could provide new clues to how life went from being simple to complex.

Britain votes Thursday in what could be one of the country's closest elections in decades.

The clock is ticking on Lokesh Todi's efforts to raise $150,000 for charities based in Nepal. That's what happens when you use social media. You set up a donation campaign on a site like Indiegogo Life (as Todi has done). Then you have a set amount of time to meet your goal. And as of 3 p.m. Wednesday, there are only 61 hours left. So far, the 28-year-old graduate from Yale University has collected over $130 ,000 from more than 1,600 donors.

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