Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Legislators in Hong Kong rejected China' plan to hand-pick the slate of candidates for the territory's next leader, but Beijing quickly announced that the vote would change nothing because it didn't reflect the will of the people.

Moments before the vote, pro-Beijing lawmakers walked out of the legislative chamber.

"Such a result is a departure from the mainstream public opinion of Hong Kong," a spokesman for the State Council's Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office. "It is also not what the central government likes to see."

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the state of Texas was legally justified in refusing to issue a proposed specialty license plate for members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

Pope Francis today issued a sweeping 184-page papal letter, writing that climate change is a global problem with far reaching environmental and social consequences — especially for the poor. He blamed apathy and greed and called on developing countries to limit the use of nonrenewable energy and to assist poorer nations.

Pope Francis is poised to issue a statement on church doctrine aimed at transforming climate change into a moral imperative for the world's 1.2 billion Catholics — a move that has already put him at odds with political conservatives in the United States.

Updated Monday at 5:45 a.m. ET.

John S. Carroll, a former editor of The Baltimore Sun and The Los Angeles Times, which he led to 13 Pulitzer Prizes in his short tenure — has died at age 73.

The LA Times described Carroll as "a courageous editor [who had an] instinct for the big story and unrelenting focus." The newspaper reported he died Sunday in Lexington, Ky., of Creutzfeldt-Jakob, a degenerative brain disease.

Last November, the European Space Agency wasn't sure if it would ever hear from its Philae lander again after the probe's unfortunate landing spot on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko left it in the shadow of a cliff, starving its solar panels of the faint sunlight needed to produce power.

Thousands of protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong to resume protests against Beijing's hand-picked pool of candidates for the territory's next chief executive – urging lawmakers to approve a reform that would instead allow direct elections.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

A South African judge has issued an interim order to prevent visiting Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir from leaving the country due to an international warrant for his arrest on charges of human rights violations.

The International Criminal Court has called on South Africa to arrest al-Bashir for war crimes and crimes against humanity over atrocities allegedly committed in the conflict in Darfur.

At least 10 people are dead in flooding that has surged through Tbilisi, the Georgian capital, and residents are being warned to stay indoors to avoid zoo animals set free by the rising water. Tigers, lions, bears, wolves and a hippo escaped their enclosures.

The Associated Press says an escaped hippo was cornered in one of the city's main squares and subdued with a tranquilizer gun, but the news agency said it was unclear how many animals were loose.

The AP says:

Updated at 6:45 p.m. EDT.

The Pentagon is considering a proposal to place M1 Abrams tanks, Bradley fighting vehicles and armored howitzers in NATO countries in the Baltic and Eastern Europe in a bid to stem what is viewed as Russian aggression.

Prosecutors in Cleveland have released details of their investigation into the fatal police shooting in November of black youth Tamir Rice, who was brandishing what turned out to be a pellet gun.

Foo Fighters lead singer Dave Grohl fell off a stage during a concert in Goteborg, Sweden — but went to the hospital and was back to finish the gig.

In videos of the incident, a seemingly calm Grohl, tells the crowd at Ullevi Stadium: "I think I really broke my leg."

"I'm going to go to hospital. I'm going to fix my leg. And then I'm going to come back," he says.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Hillary Clinton, in the first campaign speech for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, sounded a message of support for working families, calling for a new era of prosperity and pledging to support a constitutional amendment to overhaul campaign finance rules.

At a rally on New York's Roosevelt Island, she invoked the memory of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, saying FDR brought "a wider and constantly rising standard of living" to all Americans, a promise, Clinton said, "that still sounds good to me."

Six Yemenis who were prisoners at the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have arrived in Oman after their release from the facility — the first in five months and the first to be approved by Defense Secretary Ash Carter.

The Associated Press reports:

"The six men boarded a flight Friday from the U.S. facility in Cuba, and their transfer reduced Guantanamo's population to 116. President Obama has now transferred more than half the 242 detainees who were at Guantanamo when he was sworn into office in 2009 after campaigning to close it.

Updated at 3:00 p.m. ET

Automatic gunfire from an armored van shattered the glass frontage at Dallas Police headquarters before the van sped away, leading police on a chase and standoff with the driver, who was killed by a SWAT unit sniper.

Dallas Police Chief David Brown said the suspect had told negotiators that the van was "rigged with explosives" so authorities were being cautious in approaching it. A fire later erupted as authorities tried to clear the vehicle of pipe bombs.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has declined to rebut a charge that his government was involved in paying people smugglers to turn back boats carrying would-be asylum seekers, saying Canberra is determined "by hook or by crook" to stop illegal migration.

Indonesia claims that a payment of $23,000 was made to human traffickers to return 65 would-be migrants to the Indonesian island of Rote, located about 520 miles west of Darwin, The Financial Times reports.

A federal appeals panel has upheld blocking the release of Albert Woodfox — the last of the Angola 3, who has been held for more than four decades in solitary confinement in Angola State Prison in Louisiana.

Jack King, who uttered the countdown heard 'round the world followed by the historic words "Liftoff on Apollo 11!" has died at age 84.

In Zimbabwe, even the trillionaires are struggling to make ends meet.

But that is about to change as the government begins a phasing out of the massively hyperinflated Zimbabwean dollar in favor of a multi-currency regime involving mainly a mix of U.S. dollars and South African rand that, in any case, has been the de facto norm since 2009.

A judge ruled today that there's enough evidence to charge two Cleveland police officers in the fatal shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was killed in November while holding a replica gun outside a recreation center.

As The Associated Press notes, the decision is largely symbolic, because Municipal Court Judge Ronald Adrine "cannot compel prosecutors to charge the officers."

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo will step down and the social media powerhouse's co-founder and Chairman of the Board Jack Dorsey will take over as interim head, the company says.

Rupert Murdoch, the 84-year-old Australian-born media baron, says he will step down as head of the global media empire 21st Century Fox, handing the reins to his son James.

A source has confirmed to NPR's David Folkenflik that James Murdoch would become head of the company. The elder Murdoch will become co-executive chairman with another son, Lachlan.

Three astronauts are safely on the ground in Kazakhstan after their Soyuz capsule re-entered at the end of a record-breaking mission aboard the International Space Station. Their return to Earth was delayed by the loss of a Russian resupply ship.

NASA's Terry Virts, Italian Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency and Russian Anton Shkaplerov were back on terra firma after 199 days in space. Cristoforetti's stay on the ISS broke an endurance record for a female astronaut.

A massive manhunt for two killers who escaped from a prison in upstate New York has expanded to Vermont, where authorities learned the inmates talked of going before their jailbreak, but officials acknowledged that they have no firm leads.

David Sweat and Richard Matt, convicted murderers, made a complex and daring escape last weekend from the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, N.Y., and there has been no sign of them since.

ADVISORY: This video contains profanity and violence.

Police responding to reported disturbance at a community pool in McKinney, Texas, are seen in a video posted to YouTube aggressively subduing black teenagers and, at one point, pulling a gun on them.

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