Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Nigeria's Boko Haram has reportedly announced formal allegiance with the self-declared Islamic State, according to an English-language translation of an Arabic message posted to Twitter.

"We announce our allegiance to the Caliph ... and will hear and obey in times of difficulty and prosperity, in hardship and ease," according to a translation of a message purporting to be by Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau. "We call upon Muslims everywhere to pledge allegiance to the Caliph."

It was not immediately clear if the message was a video or audio only.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

President Obama, speaking in Selma, Ala., at an event marking the 50th anniversary of the "Bloody Sunday" civil rights march that witnessed hundreds of demonstrators attacked and beaten by police, said the nation was much closer to racial equality, but that the march is not over yet.

"There are places, and moments in America where this nation's destiny has been decided," the president said at the Edmund Pettus Bridge, where Alabama state troopers converged on protesters on March 7, 1965.

Birders and scientists who thought Jerdon's babbler had gone the way of the passenger pigeon now have something to crow about: it turns out that the sparrow-sized tan-colored bird is still among us, despite having been written out of the birding guides in 1941.

Updated at 4:00 p.m. ET

A fatal police shooting of an unarmed 19-year-old black man in Madison, Wis., following what officials say was an altercation with an officer, has sparked outrage among some in the community, who turned out to protest the killing.

The undersea search for wreckage from MH370, the airliner that disappeared over Asian waters a year ago, will go on through the end of May, Malaysia's transport minister says. But, if nothing turns up by then, the effort to learn the fate of the Boeing 777 goes "back to the drawing board," he says.

Speaking on the eve of the one-year anniversary of the plane's disappearance on March 8, 2014, Liow Tiong told reporters in the Malaysian capital, Kuala Lumpur: "By the end of May, if we still can't find the plane, then we will have to go back to the drawing board."

Two suspects are in custody in connection with last week's murder of Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov on a Moscow street, but it is not clear whether either of the detained are alleged to have fired the fatal shots.

Edward Snowden wants Switzerland to grant him asylum.

The NSA leaker made the remark as he spoke to an audience in Geneva via a video link from Moscow, where he has been living in exile to avoid U.S. prosecution on espionage charges.

"I would love to return to Switzerland, some of my favorite memories are from Geneva. It's a wonderful place," Snowden told the International Film Festival and Forum on Human Rights, where the Oscar-winning documentary about his case, Citizenfour, was screened.

Customs authorities in Bangladesh would like to know what a top North Korean diplomat was doing with $1.4 million in gold in his luggage as he arrived on a flight from Singapore to Dhaka.

Three men, two from Vietnam and one from Canada, who allegedly participated in a scheme to harvest a billion email addresses have been charged in what the Department of Justice describes as the largest data breach in the history of the Internet.

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first in a class of generic drugs that are made from living cells instead of chemical compounds.

Umarali Kuvatov, an outspoken critic of Tajikistan's autocratic president, was killed by a single shot to the head on a street in Istanbul, where he had been living in exile, according to Turkish media reports.

Kuvatov, 47, a businessman turned government opponent, was head of the Group 24 opposition movement. He had accused Tajik President Emomali Rahmon of corruption and nepotism.

The U.S. economy added 295,000 jobs last month, according to the Labor Department's monthly survey, and the unemployment rate dropped to 5.5 percent. The latest strong data beat expectations and follow a robust jump the previous month — a sign that the nation's economy is finally picking up steam.

Thousands of refugees have fled fighting in Tikrit, according to the U.N., as Iraqi forces backed by Shiite militias and Kurdish peshmerga battle to expel extremists from the self-declared Islamic State from the city.

Meanwhile, Reuters reports that ISIS militants have set fire to oil wells in Iraq's north in an effort to slow government forces.

What's the "Greatest Show On Earth" without elephants? Starting in 2018, anyone attending the iconic Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus act will find out.

Citing public concern about the elephants and how they are treated, the circus' parent company, Feld Entertainment, announced today that it would phase out use of the animals in its shows within three years.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

A Delta flight carrying 130 passengers and crew skidded off a snow-covered runway at New York's LaGuardia Airport on Thursday, slamming through a fence on the side of the tarmac. Six people were hurt, an official says.

Authorities initially reported no injuries from the accident. Port Authority spokesman Joe Pentangelo later said that six people had been injured, but that none of the injuries was life-threatening.

Tired of winter? It could be the season's last gasp or just wishful thinking: an area ranging all the way from Texas to the Mid-Atlantic was under a weather alert, with as much as 10 inches of new snow possible in the northern reaches.

The Weather Channel says:

"All told, roughly 83 million people were under some kind of warning or advisory for winter weather.

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

North Korea is calling an attack on U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert by a knife-wielding political activist "deserved punishment" for America's joint military exercises with Seoul. Meanwhile, Lippert, who has received stitches to his face and undergone surgery on his arm after the assault, says he is "doing well."

Secretary of State John Kerry, apparently hoping to patch a rift sparked by GOP lawmakers' decision to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address Congress without first consulting the White House, says the administration doesn't want the speech to become a political football.

Massive avalanches in a valley not far from the Afghan capital have reportedly killed nearly 200 people, adding to a total of almost 250 deaths from the worst such snow slides in three decades in the country's mountainous northeast.

Rescue workers using bulldozers worked to clear roads to the Panjshir Valley area just northeast of Kabul — an area where villagers have been cut off for almost a week.

Nearly two-thirds of Millennials who identify as Republican support legalizing marijuana, while almost half of older GOP Gen-Xers do, according to a recently released Pew survey that could be an indicator of where the debate is heading.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has announced a reduction in U.S. diplomatic staff in the country and restrictions on travel by U.S. citizens there –- as he accused Washington of "gringo" meddling.

The BBC reports:

"The president said that the US government had 100 employees working in Venezuela whereas Venezuela had 17 based in the US.

Astronauts at the International Space Station have ventured outside to perform a challenging cable installation on their orbiting platform.

Spacewalkers Terry Virts and Butch Wilmore have 400 feet of cable to install as well as two sets of antennas.

Updated at 10:08 a.m. ET

Tens of thousands of people are gathering in the Russian capital to mourn Boris Nemtsov, the former deputy prime minister turned harsh critic of President Vladimir Putin who was gunned down on a Moscow street last week.

The march, originally scheduled to oppose Russian involvement in Ukraine, was to have been led by Nemtsov himself. Following his murder, however, the gathering has turned into a wake for the fallen opposition leader.

Days after video emerged showing self-declared Islamic State extremists taking sledge hammers to pre-Islamic antiquities inside the Mosul museum, the Iraqi government has reopened the country's national museum, shuttered since the 2003 U.S. invasion of the country that toppled Saddam Hussein.

A court in Egypt has declared Hamas a "terrorist organization."

The verdict concerning Hamas, which controls Gaza, is seen as part of the government of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi's crackdown on Islamist groups.

Hamas is an offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamist party that was banned in Egypt after President Mohamed Morsi was ousted in 2013.

The Associated Press reports:

"Last month, an Egyptian court banned Hamas' military wing, the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, and also designated it a terrorist organization. ...

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