GM Recalls 105,000 More Vehicles

Jun 6, 2014
Originally published on June 6, 2014 6:59 pm

A day after General Motors admitted it failed customers who owned cars with a defective ignition switch, the automaker issued a recall for 105,000 more vehicles, bringing the total number of GM recalls so far this year to 34, involving 14 million vehicles, Michigan Public Radio's Tracy Samilton reports.

The latest recall covers 57,512 heavy-duty Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra full-size pickup trucks from model years 2014 and 2015, as well as Chevy Tahoe and Suburban and GMC Yukon SUVs from model year 2015.

GM says: "The base radio may not work, preventing audible warnings if the key is in the ignition when the driver's door is opened. Nor would there be an audible chime if a front seat belt is not buckled. If they had this condition, the trucks would be out of compliance with motor vehicle safety standards covering theft protection, rollaway protection and occupant crash protection. Dealers will reprogram the radio control module free of charge. GM is unaware of any crashes or injuries related to this condition."

The recall also covers "31,520 model year 2012 Buick Verano and Chevrolet Camaro, Cruze and Sonic compact cars for a defect in which the shorting bar inside the dual stage driver's air bag may occasionally contact the air bag terminals. If contact occurs, the air bag warning light will illuminate. If the car and terminals are contacting each other in a crash, the air bag will not deploy," the company said in a statement, adding that "no confirmed crashes" had occurred from that defect.

Reuters reports that "Globally, GM has recalled about 15.9 million vehicles. Almost 90,000 of the vehicles recalled on Friday were sold in the United States."

In an internal GM inquiry released on Thursday, the company concluded that a deadly ignition switch problem that spurred a recall of 2.6 million Chevrolet Cobalts was the result of engineering-level problems but that there had been no conspiracy or cover-up of the issue.

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